An exploration of issues involving the transnational dimension of common law. This is something other than the conventionally understood “international law,” which is simply a law governing the relations between sovereign states. What drives common law is the notion of sovereignty; at the transnational level, this means the principles  and institutions that govern relations not only between sovereign and sovereign, but between sovereign and subject, thus the delimitation of sovereignty both within and without, to the degree that it is general, applicable across the board. The following essays explore these issues in more detail.

Review of Hermann Conring's New Discourse on the Roman-German Emperor

Review of Hermann Conring's New Discourse on the Roman-German Emperor

Hermann Conring.  Hermann Conring's New Discourse on the Roman-German Emperor.  Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies, Neo-Latin Texts and Translations Series. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. xxxvii + 122 pp. $...
Vitoria's New World Order

Vitoria's New World Order

My first foray into the world of international relations -- 1991, the leadup to the 500th anniversary of Columbus' discovery of the New World. This article  explores the role of Christianity in the development of nationhood and the relations between ...
The Meaning of National Sovereignty

The Meaning of National Sovereignty

This article was originally published in two parts back in 1991 and 1992, in the runup to European Union. The questions inspired by that colossal development precipitated an in-depth inquiry into the notions of both nationhood and sovereignty. This article...
Part I: National Sovereignty and European Union

Part I: National Sovereignty and European Union

Modern Europe stands on the threshold of defining her future identity as it will exist for a long time to come. The shape of the European Community will determine not only the future course of European but also of world history. It would be no exaggeration...
Part II: Vitoria and Althusius

Part II: Vitoria and Althusius

  Through the Papal Revolution the Church in Western Europe brought the community of European nations into being. By its resistance to the imperial ideal the Papacy provided the shelter within which the developing nation-states might become firmly...
Two Kinds of Democracy

Two Kinds of Democracy

This article was published back in 1992. It explores the theme later developed in A Common Law --  the divided inheritance of modern democracy. It lays bare the origins of modern democracy, focusing on the contribution of Hugo Grotius as progenitor of...
Redeemer Nation

Redeemer Nation

This article was published in 1992. It was the last issue of the journal I published entitled Symbiotica. As the source of funding had dried up, I moved on to bigger and better things, namely, translating for an Amsterdam-based company by the name of ...
Rights, Revolutions, and World Order

Rights, Revolutions, and World Order

An analysis of the drift toward world government via "universal jurisdiction," whereby national sovereignty is stigmatized, its exercise delegitimized, and the path is cleared toward a one-world regime. Human rights are the ideological equipment used...
What We Are Up Against

What We Are Up Against

This is an article I wrote back in 2006, while researching the history of the Holy Roman Empire, and preparing Authority Not Majority . I discovered a fascinating chapter in European history, the War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714), which actually...
Thoughts on Migration

Thoughts on Migration

Originally published at the Calvinist International, Oct. 30, 2015. This is a complex matter that cannot be understood if we simply engage in emotivist responses to the latest news items that cross our paths. It's time to get serious with this discussion....